rough


rough
rough adj 1 Rough, harsh, uneven, rugged, scabrous are comparable when they mean not having a smooth or even surface, exterior, or texture.
Rough, the usual and comprehensive word, basically applies to whatever may be said to have a surface or an exterior which to the sense of touch or to the sight is not smooth but is covered with perceptible inequalities (as points, bristles, projections, or ridges)
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rough ground

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a rough block of stone

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the rough skin of chapped hands

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a rough tweed

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a rough, unshaved face

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Often when applied to materials and substances employed in the arts and in manufacturing, rough means lacking a final finish (as of polishing, smoothing, or dressing)
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a rough diamond

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rough steel

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rough lumber

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By extension the term applies also to things which impress another than the tactile sense or one's nerves or feelings as lacking in smoothness and evenness
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rough words

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rough winds

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rough sounds

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he has had a rough time

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(see also RUDE).
Harsh suggests a more definitely disagreeable sensation or impression than rough; when applied to what is felt with the hand, it implies a surface or texture that is distinctly unpleasant to the tactile sense
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a harsh fabric

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harsh sand

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or when applied to something heard, it suggests a rasping, grating quality
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harsh voices

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harsh din broke the fair music— Milton)

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and when applied to something seen, tasted, or smelled, it suggests a character or quality that is offensive or repellent to a sensitive person
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a harsh liquor

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harsh features

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a harsh combination of colors

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Unlike rough, harsh in its extended senses seldom implies lack of polish or refinement, but rather it suggests a nature that is unfeeling, cruel, and indifferent to the pain it inflicts
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a harsh critic

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a harsh parent

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or when applied to things, effectiveness in promoting discomforts or in imposing rigors
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a harsh rebuke

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a harsh climate

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a harsh sentence

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Uneven applies either to surfaces or to lines and suggests a lack of uniformity in height through all the points of the surface
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an uneven road

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an uneven floor

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or a lack of straightness and the presence of curves or angles
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an uneven edge

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an uneven hem

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In extended use it implies a lack of uniformity especially in excellence or agreeableness in all the parts (as of a life, a performance, or a work of art)
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the artist's brushwork in this painting is uneven

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the trio's playing of the sonata was uneven

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Rugged, more often applied to persons so strong and healthy or machines so strongly made that they can survive great stress and strain, is not uncommonly employed in the sense of rough; in such use it applies chiefly to surfaces broken by ridges, prominences, gorges, and gullies that can offer serious difficulty to the traveler or worker
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a rugged road up a mountain

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or which (as in the case of faces or countenances) are gaunt, seamed, or heavy- featured and suggest strength or maturity
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any resemblance between you, with your rugged strong face and your coal-black hair, and this young Adonis— Wilde

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his face had already lost its youthful chubbiness, and was becoming somewhat like William's—rough-featured, almost rugged—D. H. Lawrence

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Rugged is also applicable to writing which has not been made smooth, flowing, and agreeable to the ear, sometimes, but not necessarily, through lack of care or skill
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the most rugged-seeming of prose dialogue, the kind . . . that people sometimes praise as "simply a page torn from the book of life"— Montague

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Scabrous applies basically to a surface that is rough to the touch though not necessarily uneven; in this sense it is a generic term including such species as scaly, scurfy, scabby, thorny, prickly, knobby, and knotty when applied to surfaces
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a scabrous leaf

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a scabrous hide

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In extended use scabrous applies chiefly to subject matter or to writings and works of art having subject matter that is prickly or thorny, or difficult to treat, often because it is offensive to the tastes or morals of the community
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what writer ... has spoken more acutely on the somewhat scabrous, but none the less important subject of feminine "temperament"?— Huxley

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Analogous words: hard, solid, *firm: *coarse, gross: *rank, rampant
Antonyms: smooth
2 *rude, crude, uncouth, raw, callow, green
Analogous words: brusque, crusty, gruff, curt, blunt, *bluff: ungracious, uncivil, discourteous, impolite (see RUDE): *indecorous, unseemly, indecent, indelicate
Antonyms: gentle

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Rough — Rough, a. [Compar. {Rougher}; superl. {Roughest}.] [OE. rou?, rou, row, rugh, ruh, AS. r?h; akin to LG. rug, D. rug, D. ruig, ruw, OHG. r?h, G. rauh, rauch; cf. Lith. raukas wrinkle, rukti to wrinkle. [root] 18. Cf. {Rug}, n.] 1. Having… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • rough — [ruf] adj. [ME ruh, rugh < OE ruh, akin to Ger rauh < IE * reuk < base * reu , to tear, tear out (> RUG, ROTTEN): prob. basic sense “hairy, woolly”] 1. a) not smooth or level; having bumps, projections, etc.; uneven [a rough surface]… …   English World dictionary

  • rough — ► ADJECTIVE 1) having an uneven or irregular surface; not smooth or level. 2) not gentle; violent or boisterous: rough treatment. 3) (of weather or the sea) wild and stormy. 4) lacking sophistication or refinement. 5) not finished tidily; plain… …   English terms dictionary

  • rough — [rʌf] adjective 1. a rough figure or amount is not exact: • It is possible to give here only very rough figures. • I can only give you a rough estimate at this stage. 2. not finished: • a rough draft of the report 3 …   Financial and business terms

  • rough — [ rɶf ] n. m. • 1932; mot angl. « raboteux, grossier » ♦ Anglic. 1 ♦ Golf Partie d un terrain de golf non entretenue. 2 ♦ Ébauche, projet, dans les arts graphiques. Faire des roughs. ● rough nom masculin (anglais rough, terrain accidenté) Terrain …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Rough — Rough, v. t. 1. To render rough; to roughen. [1913 Webster] 2. To break in, as a horse, especially for military purposes. Crabb. [1913 Webster] 3. To cut or make in a hasty, rough manner; with out; as, to rough out a carving, a sketch. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • rough — rough, roughen Rough is used as a verb chiefly in the expressions to rough it (= do without basic comforts), to rough out (= to make a sketch of), to rough up (= to attack). Otherwise the verb from rough, meaning ‘to make or become rough’ is… …   Modern English usage

  • Rough — Rough, n. 1. Boisterous weather. [Obs.] Fletcher. [1913 Webster] 2. A rude fellow; a coarse bully; a rowdy. [1913 Webster] {In the rough}, in an unwrought or rude condition; unpolished; as, a diamond or a sketch in the rough. [1913 Webster]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Rough — may refer to:* Roughness * Rough, the area outside the fairway in golf * Rough (manga) * Rough (facility), gas storage in England * Rough (Tina Turner Album) …   Wikipedia

  • rough — [adj1] uneven, irregular asperous, bearded, brambly, bristly, broken, bumpy, bushy, chapped, choppy, coarse, cragged, craggy, cross grained, disheveled, fuzzy, hairy, harsh, jagged, knobby, knotty, nappy, nodular, not smooth, ridged, rocky,… …   New thesaurus